Data collection 101


Today at 4 o’clock I thanked my final volunteer for participating in my study. I have officially finished data collection! I still can’t quite believe it but it certainly feels good to have reached this milestone. I wanted to celebrate with a hot chocolate, but by that time everything was closed so I had a celebratory Turkish delight at home instead.

Now is as good a time as any to reflect on what the experience has taught me. Firstly, data collection was a lesson in adapting to the unexpected. One particularly memorable experience was opening the door to a room I had booked for my study, to be greeted by fifteen people balefully staring back at me. After a hasty retreat I was able to find another room. Secondly, I learned that you can never be too organised. I carried a folder with me filled with spare study materials, which, entitled with the name of my study, doubled as a sign. This certainly paid off. I had arranged to meet my participants at a landmark on campus. The only problem was, I had no idea what each of my participants looked like and the place I had chosen was quite a popular meeting point. I resorted to conspicuously displaying my improvised sign and asking anyone in the vicinity if they were participating in my study. It worked quite well, though on one occasion I was approached by someone who, after some initial confusion on both our parts, turned out to be a curious stranger. Lastly I learned a lesson or three about data entry. If you need to reverse code something, TRIPLE CHECK you have recoded everything you need to. Double checking is not enough, believe me. I also found keeping multiple copies of my data, and a codebook to make sure the 1s and 0s I’d entered in SPSS meant more to me than binary code, quite useful.

Tomorrow I am taking the day to ‘regroup.’ I want to have a clear plan of where I am headed with my analyses and discussion. It is after all a very significant day today, one month until my thesis is due.

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Filed under A day in the life, analyses, data, Honours year, Research, running a study

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