You’re not in Kansas anymore…


As a psychologist in training you learn from other psychologists who deliver your coursework, assess you and/or supervise your placements. Most of the psychologists who trained me worked in the private sector or in clinical research settings. And most of my placement experiences were alongside other psychologists in the private sector. This meant I learned a lot of valuable things about how to be a psychologist, what we do, and why we do it. What I didn’t learn so much about was how we do all of this within the broader system…

There’s nothing quite like stepping out from the environment of a psychologist in training and into the broader mental health system for the first time.  It’s a Dorothy and Toto moment – you are definitely not in Kansas anymore! There are a dizzying array of professions, services, settings and interventions to work with. You begin to truly appreciate what is unique about the way psychology teaches you to think about and approach things. And, you have to figure out how to navigate all the policies, procedures and systems both as representative of your profession and of your clients. It’s hard work!

Reflecting back now on my training – all those times the various ethical guidelines were hammered home, how every situation became an exercise in critical thinking and how I began to suspect I’d be talking about collaborative evidence-based practice in my sleep, I finally get it. It may have seemed dry, repetitive and even unnecessary at times, but all that groundwork was crucial. Why? Well psychology training can be a bit of an echo chamber. It has to be, without that immersion in your profession you can’t get a strong sense of what it is we do and why. But, once you get Out There and realise how different things are it can be a bit of a shock. You may well find yourself in situations where the way you have always operated and your perspectives doesn’t fit with the broader system or other disciplines.  And that’s okay. You just have to try to figure out where to adapt and when to hold your ground and be able to argue your case either way. And it’s because of all that ground work you did as a student, that you can do this.

Keeping it real…learning to make those calls in the bigger system can be terrifying. You will make mistakes, step on toes, and sometimes it just won’t work. At the same time though, that messiness is how you learn and bring about change if you’re willing.  You might even surprise yourself in the process, I certainly have. Only this week I put forward an alternate formulation to a senior clinician, backing my own clinical reasoning and evidence.  Later, another clinician took me to the side to tell me I’d made a good call and that this ability to assert my case and trust my judgement, even when it differed from my seniors, was a real strength of mine. It was bemusing to realise this skill that I was being recognised for was not one I’d possessed at the start of this year and was probably something I would not have predicted I’d have developed by now. So believe me when I say, anything is possible!

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Filed under Early career, Practice, Reflections

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