Category Archives: Book Club

The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog

Now that I’ve some time on my hands, I’m reviving the Psychology Book Club and trying to make a dent in my to-read pile.

This week’s selection is “The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog” by Bruce Perry and Maria Szalavitz.

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The Whistle-Stop Tour

  • Intended audience: Health professionals, people interested in psychology or trauma.
  • Content: 275 pages of case studies about psychiatrist Bruce Perry’s experiences working with young people affected by trauma.
  • Readability: Easy to understand. Nb. some case studies may be distressing/triggering.
  • Practicality: There are layers here, probably one to re-read to get the most out of it.
  • Cost: Kindle $AUD 9.67; paperback copy from the Book Depository $AUD 13.70
  • Publication details: Basic Books 2006
  • Overall rating: ★★★★★

The Extended Review

I first heard about this book being described as a ‘must read’ for those interested in working with childhood trauma when I was beginning my postgraduate training. It was recommended to me again more recently in the context of trauma more generally. Now that I’ve finally gotten round to reading it, I can say that it does not disappoint.

Perry describes his experiences working with a range of children and their families affected by trauma. These are real people in very challenging circumstances and so this book is not a light read. However, the resilience of the people behind each story really shines through.

The frank and reflective style of the authors provides some great insights into what worked, what didn’t and why. Perry also touches on the evidence base for various approaches and the links between brain and behaviour without presuming any prior knowledge. Really there’s something for everyone in here whatever your therapeutic orientation or stage of career.

Personally, I’ve walked away with some more nuanced ideas about supporting young people through trauma disclosure, a greater awareness of the impact of the timing of trauma and an interest in the neurosequential model.

In sum, the insights in this book translate beyond working with children or people affected by trauma, so if you’re a health professional, it’s really worth a read.

If you’ve read ‘The Boy Who Was Raised as Dog,’ what stood out for you?

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Filed under Book Club, psychology