Category Archives: career

The Five Year Plan

McLeod’s Daughters, an Aussie TV show, follows a group of women as they negotiate the challenges of life and running a cattle station in the outback. It’s been a long-time since the show first aired, but it’s definitely worth a watch if you haven’t seen it yet.

Over the past few months as I’ve tried to map out where my career might be headed next, I’ve been reminded of Kate, one of the drovers on McLeod’s Daughters. Kate always had big ideas, tenacity and, a need to organise; she had a massive five year plan taped to her wall complete with short, medium and long-term goals!

Like Kate, I’ve always been a planner, at least when it comes to work or study. So I had a plan for how I would become a psychologist:

1) Get good enough grades in Year 12 to get into an Honours program,

2) Gain experience in the field to test out whether psychology was definitely the right fit and to give me a good chance of getting into a postgraduate program in psychology,

3) Seize every opportunity to develop my research, teaching and psychological practice skills and to develop an area of specialty

4) Walk out of uni being able to research, lecture and/or practice as a psychologist.

I first laid out these plans when I was 17, well at least points 1 and 4. Point 2 was added by the end of my first year of uni. And truth be told my pursuit of point 3 was a mixture of deliberate planning and happy accident. I soon noticed that the happy accidents led me to some really interesting places. And it’d be fair to say that my mantra became “this scares me and will be a logistical nightmare, but it’s really going to teach me a lot of things… Sign me up!”

It is very surreal to look back on all those plans and realise that I’ve more or less achieved them. Sure, some things changed as I went along, as they should with any good plan and the influence of serendipity, but now here I am – a psychologist and soon to be qualified academic. It honestly still doesn’t feel real typing that out.

Having reached the end-game of my decade long plan of becoming a psychologist I’ve had some time to think about where my journey might be headed next. At this stage, I have a broad strokes plan:

My main goal is to move towards working as a psychologist in private practice. There are pro’s and con’s to work in the public and private sector, but longer term I feel that private practice is the best fit for me. Chiefly because it will give me greater flexibility in how I operate as a psychologist and how I structure my work-life balance.

I also have a side project that’s important to me too. I’d like to get my research published and some of its more practical elements being used by other psychologists. Long-term that might even involve some consultancy work, outreach and policy development. Who knows? This particular scheme might well take a good ten years to come to fruition, but that’s okay.

I wonder in another five or ten years, which parts of this broad strokes plan will come to fruition, which will change, and how I’ll get there? In my next post I’ll flesh out the private practice plan and how that links in with my job search. Stay tuned 🙂

 

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Filed under career, Early career, Goals, Reflections

Contemplating a PhD? Please read this.

My university allows high school students to shadow academic staff for their work experience. I think it’s a great idea. It got me to thinking though, what do they or anyone contemplating entering academia, need to know? Here’s my two cents.

The fundamental thing anyone contemplating academia needs to know is that there are many, many, many more PhD students than there are academic jobs. Stats vary, but only about 40 to 50 percent of the people who complete a PhD will actually get a job in academia. The few who manage to secure a job, almost always have to travel interstate or overseas to do so.

From my own observations, the few who break into academia have this in common:

  1. A lot of first-author publications, usually in high impact journals (essential).
  2. An ‘in’ with a research group – perhaps they did a mini-post-doc during their PhD at another lab or, secured a highly  prestigious scholarship often used to cherry-pick future employees (advantageous)
  3. Teaching experience (advantageous)
  4. Conference presentations, media coverage of one’s research, involvement with research organisations in the field (advantageous)
  5. Industry skills.  Many of the psych PhD’s I know who did manage to get an academic job also had a qualification as a psychologist which gave them an edge, particularly for the more applied type post-docs (possibly advantageous)

The more of these boxes you tick, the greater your odds of success BUT, it is entirely possible that you still will not find work in academia.

It is also very important to remember that not finding work in academia often has very little to do with your capacity to be an academic. With so many brilliant people completing PhDs and so little funding, the supply of PhD graduates is just way too high for the demand. So if you are one of the vast majority who have found a career outside of academia (not by choice) know that you  were just as capable as the people who did get in to the ivory tower.

I’m a big fan of being practical. So, given the odds of academic work are so low, what can you do about it?

  1. Choose a project and team that will help you tick those boxes I mentioned. From day one, develop a clear plan about how you and your team (your supervisor, research higher degree support services, uni career counselors, journal club, partner, family, friends) are going to get you ticking off those boxes. That plan will change, and repeatedly. But as they say, a dream without a plan is just a wish.
  2. Make sure you have a solid, viable, ‘Plan B.’ If you take one thing away from reading this post, please, please let it be this!  This is every bit as essential as point #1. The most obvious Plan B though there may be others, is to have a clear and viable pathway into an industry related to your PhD. How? Make connections, do internships, choose an applied project, do a research project proposed by an organisation involved in that industry and/or, do a double degree that will give you an automatic qualification in industry like I did.

I haven’t written this with the intention to scare you.  What I am hoping is that you might go into the decision-making about whether to do a PhD more informed. These issues are discussed far too infrequently in academia, despite their consequences for incoming PhD students.

Anything else to add? Any stories about breaking into industry, in particular?

Honourable Mentions

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Filed under academic culture, career, Clinical Phd, postgraduate applications, Reflections, Research

I’m still here

It’s been a tumultuous year. I’ve discussed some of this before, but 10 months out I’ve some more perspective. Here goes nothing.

In January, I took an intermission from my PhD to travel overseas with a family member with a chronic health condition to assist them in helping another sick family member. I spent three months there. In those three months I did not work on or even think about my PhD. I didn’t have the time!

It took those three months just focusing on the day to day, removed from the world of academia to finally process what I had begun to realise in the the third year of my PhD; I wanted out of academia. It was a scary and a liberating realisation. It was liberating to decide that I wanted out because I could get off the merry-go-round of publish or perish and extra-curricula commitments designed to make me a competitive candidate for academia. Instead, I could focus on finishing my Clinical PhD and pursuing clinical work both therapy and assessments full-time rather than predominantly assessment work part-time as I had previously intended.

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I took some more time off when I returned home to recuperate from all the care-taking I had been doing. Then I began to consider how equipped I was for my new game plan. I had some concerns. Across the placements I’d completed and my research, I’d gained considerable experience with diagnostic and assessment work and good grounding in therapy for supporting children and their families. However, I had relatively less experience providing therapy to adults.  I felt that I had not yet had enough experience with adult therapy to rule this sort of work in or out, and that I could do with more exposure working with this population in an in-patient clinic setting to complement my previous experience in  community based psycho-social rehab work.

I voiced my concerns to someone in the department and was offered an extra placement that would give me the chance to support people with some of the most complex difficulties you can encounter as a psychologist and give me a greater breadth and depth of experience. The catch? The placement would clearly be very challenging, involved a very long commute and would finish just three months before my thesis was due. The placement was exactly what I needed, but the timing was awful. What did I do? I took the opportunity anyway.

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I’ve since started the placement and it was a good move. The challenges the clients who attend the clinic present with are complex but the supervision is excellent and I’m learning so much. Thankfully the commute is a little quicker than anticipated too. The work is also less difficult than I anticipated too.

As for the impact on my research, I can’t deny that there has been an effect. I’ve not written a thing towards my thesis, but data collection is getting there, slowly. So I just remind myself to do what I can and be kind to myself. It’s bittersweet watching my cohort enter the final weeks before they submit, knowing they will soon be gone and I will still be here. But next year, that will be me too: thesis submitted, job applications in, freedom awaiting.

This past year and my clinical work has reminded me of a favourite maxim of mine that I would like to share with you:

Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind. Always.

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Filed under academic culture, career, Clinical Phd, PhD, placement, psychology, Reflections