Category Archives: Early career

The Transition from PhD Student to Psychologist

Ever wondered what it’s like for to make the transition from PhD student to psychologist? Read on!

What’s it like adjusting to full-time work?

It’s a walk in the park. Across the years of completing my PhD I was regularly clocking in a lot more than a 40 hour work week. Now, I have weekends. My evenings are free from administrative tasks, assignments, emails and extra work. I physically can’t bring my work home with me. It’s amazing! I have so much more time and brain space now. I’m even learning to play the guitar, something I’ve wanted to do for almost a decade but just could never fit in with all the other things I was juggling.

What’s it like getting back into doing therapy?

The gap between the final placement and first job plays on the minds of many a psychologist in training. Why? Well in any post-grad psych degree you juggle coursework, placement and a thesis. Once they’re all passed, you can register as a psychologist and look for a job. However, for many Clinical PhD students there can be a gap of around a year between finishing placements and seeking registration because completing the thesis takes up a lot of time. Many students therefore worry that their therapy skills may become rusty from lack of use and/or that they will be less marketable to potential employers.

From my perspective, I had a gap of about a year between placement and my job search and it did not deter potential employers in the slightest. The transition into getting back into doing therapy again was also so anticlimactic that it was ridiculous. It was just like riding a bike again. Well, what I assume that would be like if I’d ever properly mastered bike riding to being with ;).

What’s it like no longer being a student?

I’m finding that this last aspect of transition takes the most getting used to, and perhaps not for the reasons that you would expect. On a trivial level, I can now officially identify as ‘psychologist’ rather than ‘trainee psychologist.’ It saves time when writing case notes and is a much more readily understandable job! If I had a dollar for every time I had to clarify what being a trainee psychologist meant…

On a less trivial note, the hierarchy I operate in now is different. I have more peers than superiors and my colleagues regularly look to me for insights due to my training or specialty. This stands at odds to the distinct hierarchy of academic research within which I’ve spent the bulk of the last decade! I’m also far less likely to be surrounded by other psychologists now than in the clinics I’ve worked in on placements.

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Filed under A day in the life, Clinical Phd, Early career, psychology, Reflections

The Five Year Plan

McLeod’s Daughters, an Aussie TV show, follows a group of women as they negotiate the challenges of life and running a cattle station in the outback. It’s been a long-time since the show first aired, but it’s definitely worth a watch if you haven’t seen it yet.

Over the past few months as I’ve tried to map out where my career might be headed next, I’ve been reminded of Kate, one of the drovers on McLeod’s Daughters. Kate always had big ideas, tenacity and, a need to organise; she had a massive five year plan taped to her wall complete with short, medium and long-term goals!

Like Kate, I’ve always been a planner, at least when it comes to work or study. So I had a plan for how I would become a psychologist:

1) Get good enough grades in Year 12 to get into an Honours program,

2) Gain experience in the field to test out whether psychology was definitely the right fit and to give me a good chance of getting into a postgraduate program in psychology,

3) Seize every opportunity to develop my research, teaching and psychological practice skills and to develop an area of specialty

4) Walk out of uni being able to research, lecture and/or practice as a psychologist.

I first laid out these plans when I was 17, well at least points 1 and 4. Point 2 was added by the end of my first year of uni. And truth be told my pursuit of point 3 was a mixture of deliberate planning and happy accident. I soon noticed that the happy accidents led me to some really interesting places. And it’d be fair to say that my mantra became “this scares me and will be a logistical nightmare, but it’s really going to teach me a lot of things… Sign me up!”

It is very surreal to look back on all those plans and realise that I’ve more or less achieved them. Sure, some things changed as I went along, as they should with any good plan and the influence of serendipity, but now here I am – a psychologist and soon to be qualified academic. It honestly still doesn’t feel real typing that out.

Having reached the end-game of my decade long plan of becoming a psychologist I’ve had some time to think about where my journey might be headed next. At this stage, I have a broad strokes plan:

My main goal is to move towards working as a psychologist in private practice. There are pro’s and con’s to work in the public and private sector, but longer term I feel that private practice is the best fit for me. Chiefly because it will give me greater flexibility in how I operate as a psychologist and how I structure my work-life balance.

I also have a side project that’s important to me too. I’d like to get my research published and some of its more practical elements being used by other psychologists. Long-term that might even involve some consultancy work, outreach and policy development. Who knows? This particular scheme might well take a good ten years to come to fruition, but that’s okay.

I wonder in another five or ten years, which parts of this broad strokes plan will come to fruition, which will change, and how I’ll get there? In my next post I’ll flesh out the private practice plan and how that links in with my job search. Stay tuned 🙂

 

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Filed under career, Early career, Goals, Reflections